Author: Daisy Christodoulou

Feedback and English mocks

You can also read this post on the No More Marking blog. In the previous few posts, I’ve looked at the workload generated by traditional English mock marking, and at the low reliability, and I’ve suggested that comparative judgement can produce more reliable results and take less time. However, one question I frequently get about… Read more »

Read more

Workload and English mocks

You can also read this post on the No More Marking blog here. Last weekend, I posted a question to English teachers on Twitter. English teachers: how long does it take you to mark one English Language GCSE paper? — Daisy Christodoulou (@daisychristo) July 15, 2017 Most of the answers were in the range of… Read more »

Read more

Life after Levels: Five years on

Exactly five years ago, the government announced that national curriculum levels would be removed – and not replaced. Here’s a quick guide to some of my life after levels blog posts from the last five years. It was definitely a good thing to abolish levels. As I argued here, here and here, they didn’t give… Read more »

Read more

Sharing Standards 2016-17: The results

In July, I will be leaving my role at Ark Schools to work for No More Marking as Director of Education.  Over the last 6 months, No More Marking have been working with primary schools in England on a pilot of comparative judgement for year 6 writing called Sharing Standards. Comparative judgement is a quick… Read more »

Read more

The Global Education and Skills Forum 2017

Last week I spoke at the Global Education and Skills Forum in Dubai. I took part in a debate on the following topic: This house believes 21st century learners need their heads filled with pure facts. I spoke for the motion, together with Nick Gibb, the Minister of State for School Standards in the UK. Speaking… Read more »

Read more

Shakespeare and creative education

This essay was first published in the Spring 2016 edition of Use of English. I can remember reading Othello for the first time when I was studying A-level, and feeling slightly disappointed and cheated when I read the notes about Shakespeare’s sources for the play. What particularly offended me was how the main female character in the… Read more »

Read more

How can we measure progress in lessons?

This is part 6 of a series of blogs on my new book, Making Good Progress?: The future of Assessment for Learning. Click here to read the introduction to the series. With national curriculum levels, it was possible to use the same system of measurement in exams as in individual lessons. For example, national curriculum tests at… Read more »

Read more