Month: February 2014

Seven Myths – the evidence base, part III

In my previous two posts (here and here), I looked at the structure of my book and restated some of the evidence I’d used to make the claim that a certain set of ideas were dominant in English education. In this post, I want to restate the evidence I used to back up my second… Read more »

Read more

Seven Myths: The evidence base, part II

I have noticed that a common response to my book has been a) to deny the existence of the myths I’ve outlined and b) to claim that they are not myths after all. This is not only rather illogical, it’s also something I anticipated prior to publication in this blog post. Very often, I’d give… Read more »

Read more

Seven Myths: The evidence base, part I

In Seven Myths about Education, I make two claims: first, that in English education, a certain set of ideas about education are predominant; second, that these ideas are misguided. Finding the evidence to prove the second point was relatively straightforward. It is scientifically well-established that working memory is limited and that long-term memory plays a significant… Read more »

Read more

Nate Silver and E.D. Hirsch

Over Christmas I read Nate Silver’s excellent book The Signal and the Noise. Silver runs the FiveThirtyEight politics blog and became famous for his uncannily accurate predictions of US elections. Before predicting elections, he predicted the success of baseball players and teams. Before that, he made money playing online poker. His book is a distillation… Read more »

Read more